Archives:

John Cronin at Harbor School: “Turning the Tide of Environmental History…”

Original Hudson Riverkeeper Addresses Next Generation of Water Advocates Governors Island, NYC, June 27, 2016— In the world of Harbor restoration, it was an extraordinary moment. John Cronin, the original Hudson Riverkeeper, was the speaker for Urban Assembly New York Harbor School’s 10th graduation. Addressing students at the campus of the Billion Oyster Project’s flagship […]

“Smart and Connected Communities NYC” STEM Colloquium Speaks to the Power of Public Engagement in Environmental Justice and Stewardship

One of the most exciting aspects of the BOP Curriculum and Community Enterprise for Restoration Science (BOP-CCERS) is that it’s a collaboration of a huge, diverse community of myriad talents who are all passionate about New York Harbor restoration and authentic, hands-on STEM education.  We’re fortunate that the STEM CCERS network fosters an interdisciplinary exchange […]

Simons Foundation

The Simons Foundation’s mission is to advance the frontiers of research in mathematics and the basic sciences. Cofounded in New York City by Jim and Marilyn Simons, the foundation celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2014. The Simons Foundation at its core exists to support basic — or discovery-driven — scientific research, undertaken in pursuit of understanding the phenomena of our world. The support of The Simons Foundation has allowed for the development of our Volunteer Program and Community Reefs initiative. Currently our public volunteer days, are held every Friday in the Spring and Summer. Volunteer days are a crucial component to our oyster production and restoration process, preparing oyster restoration stations for citizen science and BOP teachers’ training as well as washing and bagging recycled oyster shells for planting season. Our volunteers provide extra hands for our CTE teachers with needs varying from equipment cleanup and organization to vessel maintenance. We conduct our volunteer days to engage the greater public, school groups, and corporate groups who play a direct role in the oyster restoration process. Volunteer days are the bedrock of promoting awareness of the importance of oysters in our ecosystem and how we can all play a part in restoring their New York Harbor population. BOP aims to engage a wider net of the NYC community through in-water community-based oyster reefs in each borough. Starting with pilot reefs at Bush Terminal Park, Brooklyn Bridge Park and Whitehall Slip. Lack of waterfront access is a huge challenge in engaging NYC communities to form a relationship with their local waterways. Through our community reefs, the public will get in the water and have the opportunity to experience and participate in monitoring the quality and health of their reefs through BOP community volunteer events.

Second Annual Billion Oyster Project Research Symposium Celebrates Another Fantastic Year of Student Research!

Student-driven research, a scavenger hunt of Governors Island, oyster tastings, a keynote from renowned author and environmentalist Paul Greenberg, and an original musical called Salty Folk– the second Annual BOP Research Symposium on June 10th had it all!  The culminating event of the school year for students participating in the NSF-funded BOP Curriculum and Community […]

Billion Oyster People: Debby Keehn

Periodically, we use this space to highlight the words & experience of a member of the BOP community. BOP volunteer Debby Keehn spoke of her time on Governors Island today: The highlight of volunteering was being able to meet the extraordinary Harbor School graduates who were helping coordinate the day.  Both Jennifer and Chastity had stories […]

Harbor School: the BOP Powerhouse

  Yesterday marked Harbor School’s annual Senior Awards Banquet.  Harbor School faculty and BOP staff had the opportunity to recognize particular students for the achievements of the past four years, and as the awards went on, themes began to emerge: students who had gone above and beyond their schoolwork, who had pushed past difficulty, who […]

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