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Our Partners

Become a Partner

BOP is a partnership of schools, businesses, nonprofits, and individuals all working together to grow oysters and make our city a healthier and more resilient place to live. The project was founded by New York Harbor School and built over the past four years through extensive collaboration and consultation with teachers, scientists, engineers, architects, policy makers, and local communities who are actively working to restore their local marine environment. Harbor School continues to serve as the production hub of BOP, growing more than a million oysters per year and providing facilities, expertise, and a corps of dedicated students to support these large-scale efforts. None of this, however, would be possible without BOP partners who make the goals of restoration a reality. Each partner provides a unique contribution to sustain and support the Project, from design and implementation to long-term monitoring and sustainability. BOP partners may also choose to serve on our advisory committee, which sets yearly operating plans and helps to develop our long-term strategy, goals, and metrics for community based restoration and education. If your organization believes it may have a role to play in any aspect of this process, please do not hesitate to get in touch with us. We look forward to working with you!

Partners

Simons Foundation

The Simons Foundation’s mission is to advance the frontiers of research in mathematics and the basic sciences. Cofounded in New York City by Jim and Marilyn Simons, the foundation celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2014. The Simons Foundation at its core exists to support basic — or discovery-driven — scientific research, undertaken in pursuit of understanding the phenomena of our world. The support of The Simons Foundation has allowed for the development of our Volunteer Program and Community Reefs initiative. Currently our public volunteer days, are held every Friday in the Spring and Summer. Volunteer days are a crucial component to our oyster production and restoration process, preparing oyster restoration stations for citizen science and BOP teachers’ training as well as washing and bagging recycled oyster shells for planting season. Our volunteers provide extra hands for our CTE teachers with needs varying from equipment cleanup and organization to vessel maintenance. We conduct our volunteer days to engage the greater public, school groups, and corporate groups who play a direct role in the oyster restoration process. Volunteer days are the bedrock of promoting awareness of the importance of oysters in our ecosystem and how we can all play a part in restoring their New York Harbor population. BOP aims to engage a wider net of the NYC community through in-water community-based oyster reefs in each borough. Starting with pilot reefs at Bush Terminal Park, Brooklyn Bridge Park and Whitehall Slip. Lack of waterfront access is a huge challenge in engaging NYC communities to form a relationship with their local waterways. Through our community reefs, the public will get in the water and have the opportunity to experience and participate in monitoring the quality and health of their reefs through BOP community volunteer events.

NYC Department of Education

The New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) is the largest K-12 school system in the United States, with over 1.1 million students taught by more than 73,000 teachers in 1,800 public schools across the five boroughs. The role of the public school system in helping to shape the lives of New York City’s young people, families, and communities cannot be overstated. The same can be said of the relationship between the NYCDOE and the Billion Oyster Project. More than any other single partner, the DOE has played a critical role in helping to establish the project and in supporting its long term objective of engaging every student in the city in the restoration and stewardship of New York Harbor. With the establishment of the BOP Schools and Citizen Science program through a five million-dollar National Science Foundation educational research grant, the direct involvement of the NYCDOE has increased dramatically, both in terms of the number of schools directly participating in the project (more than 55 as of March 2016) and in the level of administrative support provided to teachers and principals. This increased involvement and support has been championed in particular by the Office of Curriculum, Instruction and Professional Learning’s Department of STEM. The STEM Department serves three essential roles in the Billion Oyster Project: as co-principal investigator on the NSF grant, member of the BOP advisory board, and as facilitator of BOP-focused STEM professional development programs for teachers. We expect these relationships to continue to grow as BOP further develops its middle school core curriculum and increases the number of slots available in its teacher training and professional development programs. Under the leadership of Chancellor Fariña, the NYCDOE remains strongly committed to BOP, and will continue to support the effort to link public school curricula to keystone species restoration and ensure that every student and teacher in New York City has the opportunity to participate in scientific restoration of New York Harbor during their regular school day.